pandorasaurus:

I just finished rewatching Nicki Minaj’s Anaconda because girl is so fierce, but immediately become upset over the YouTube comments saying black women are sluts who should be sold back into slavery.

Don’t ever try to tell me that racism isn’t a factor in 2014.

"

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

"

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

GO THE FUCK OFFFF

(via thagal)

(via maniacwrangler)

"

American exceptionalism — perhaps the most prominent of exceptionalist doctrines — is the idea that the U.S. is qualitatively different from and morally superior to the rest of the world, such that it should act and be treated according to its own special set of rules…

The U.S. government that admits it ‘tortured some folks’ doesn’t generally believe that torture is OK; instead, it made a few exceptions.

The U.S. government — and, I should add, the libertarian right — doesn’t generally believe that it’s OK to wiretap citizens without due process, to execute citizens abroad without due process, or to hold the accused indefinitely without due process; but again, with the right justifications and exigencies in play, they’ve made some exceptions…

The U.S. Constitution doesn’t generally suggest it’s OK to stop and frisk, let alone shoot citizens of any race or creed without reasonable suspicion and cause; but under the “right” circumstances, we make exceptions.

The objective is never to violate rights, compromise sacred principles and murder the innocent; the objective is.. rhetorically reinforcing the delusion that your moral superiority puts you above the laws and customs of everyone else.

We witness in Ferguson a microcosm of this logic, where agents of the state have turned the doctrine of exceptionalism on our own people to justify the suspension of basic civil rights. If basic civil rights dictate due process, black Americans are the exception. If basic civil rights dictate freedom of the press, those journalists arrested for doing their jobs are the exception. If basic civil rights dictate free expression and peaceable assembly, the crowds in Ferguson taking rubber-bullet flack and choking on clouds of tear gas are the exception. The problem with so many exceptions, however, is that they risk becoming the rule.

For this reason it’s crucial that we understand how this logic of exceptionalism works, whether in matters foreign or domestic. The logic of exceptionalism means that someone can always make an exception of you, or of the codes in place meant to protect you.

"

This has always been America: Ferguson and our dangerous delusions on race and democracy

(via ayychee)

http://ayychee.tumblr.com/post/94788955024/i-went-to-college-in-san-diego-not-too-long-ago

ayychee:

I went to college in San Diego not too long ago. We watched a video in one of my classes about the KKK. Students laughed. They laughed as if what was going on was too far fetched and out of the realm of reality to be applicable to millennial life.

Those attitudes still exist. People still hate…

fotojournalismus:

Ferguson, Mo. | August 13, 2014

1. A protester throws back a smoke bomb while clashing with police. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

2. Riot police clear a street with smoke bombs. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

3. Police surround and detain two people in a car. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

4. Police officers work their way north on West Florissant Avenue, clearing the road with the use of tear gas and smoke bombs. (Robert Cohen/AP)

5. A police officer patrols a business district. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

6. A demonstrator, protesting the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, stands his ground as police fire tear gas. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

7. An explosive device deployed by police flies in the air. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

8. A demonstrator holds up a Pan-African flag to protest the killing of Michael Brown. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

9. A device fired by police goes off in the street. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

10. A demonstrator throws back a tear gas container after tactical officers worked to break up a group of bystanders on Chambers Road and West Florissant in St. Louis. (Robert Cohen/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

(via lipstick-feminists)